Martu met Tanya Plibersek at the PEW “Creating a modern outback: A forum on the future of Australia’s heartland” lunch at Parliament house

Martu met Tanya Plibersek at the PEW “Creating a modern outback: A forum on the future of Australia’s heartland” lunch at Parliament house

Martu representatives and Peter See (KJ CEO) with Michael Loebenstein, CEO National Film and Sound Archive

Martu representatives and Peter See (KJ CEO) with Michael Loebenstein, CEO National Film and Sound Archive

Martu visit Canberra to talk to politicians

Four Martu traveled to Canberra for a week in March to talk to politicians about the ranger and Indigenous Protected Area programs.  The group was keen to share positive stories about the programs and the social, cultural and economic benefits for Martu and their families.  They also wanted to ask the government about funding for the ranger and Indigenous Protected Area Program past June 2018.  

All of the meetings were constructive, and there was strong support from the major parties about the importance and successes of the ranger program.

The group also spoke to some departments about potential funding for a women’s leadership program.  After seeing the great benefit of the men’s leadership program over the past two years, Martu women are eager to have their own program.


On the last day in Canberra, the group visited the National Film and Sound Archive.  They were given a tour of the facility and saw how old films and audio are kept safe.  Martu were very excited to see an old film donated to KJ by Peter Pinkus being looked after and digitized.  Peter Pinkus was a Department of Native Welfare patrol officer who met a number of Martu pujiman (bushman) families in the 1960s.

 

Slim Williams, Brenda Sailor, Cassandra Nanudie and Andrew Minyardie outside of Parliament house

Slim Williams, Brenda Sailor, Cassandra Nanudie and Andrew Minyardie outside of Parliament house